Can I Go To The Bathroom Vs May I?

Can I or may I Which is correct?

Which do you think is correct.

If you use “Can I…” you are literally asking if you have the ability to pick the book up from the person’s hands, walk away with it, and return it later.

If you use “May I…” then you are asking permission to use the book and bring it back at a later time..

When to say may I?

As for May I at the start of a sentence, its commonest use is as a rhetorical device – typically in a speech or official meeting – for introducing a statement or suggestion (rather than a question): May I say how deeply honoured I am to be invited to chair the NCVO.

Can I request or request may?

‘May’ is more correct, as it is asking for permission. ‘Can’ literally means ‘is it (physically) possible?’ but is often used in this way by native speakers and would not be misunderstood or sound at all strange. ‘Could I use your bathroom?’

Is Loo rude?

The word loo is not rude, as you can tell from this link http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/loo?q=loo. It’s just an informal/colloquial word in the UK. It’s as simple as that. The word restroom is not really used in the UK, as is John in this context.

What is the posh word for toilet?

Toilet: According to Kate, this term is detested because of its French origins. The royal family apparently say ‘loo’ or ‘lavatory’ instead. Kate says you should never use the terms ‘gents’, ‘ladies’ ‘bathroom’ or ‘powder room’.

Can I or may I go to the bathroom?

The phrase they use is “May I go to the restroom/toilet please”. However, some “star tutor” says “Can I go to the restroom please” should be used instead. Because, “may” is too strong a modal verb and should be replaced by “can”.

How do you politely ask to go to the bathroom?

You simply say, “Excuse me, I need to goto the restroom.”, or, “Excuse me, I need to goto the bathroom.”, or, “Excuse me, can I use your restroom?”, or, “Pardon me, is there a bathroom nearby?” (like in a store you might use this one).

Is it rude to say toilet in America?

“Toilet” isn’t considered rude or a swear word, it’s just considered mildly explicit when you’re using it in this fashion. It’s a bit of a giveaway, though. If anybody ever asks me about “a toilet,” then they’re highly likely not American and haven’t been in the country long enough to pick up on the use of ‘bathroom.

Can I ask a question?

One would either say “I have a question” or “May / Can I ask a question” instead. “Can I ask a question?” is commonly said, but better still is “May I ask a question?” “Can” generally refers to having the ability to do something, whereas “may” is a way of asking permission to do something.

Can I help you or may I help you?

English (U.S.) Both are correct, but the meaning is not the same. “Can I help you?” is probably more common.

Where do we use may?

Uses of May and MightPermission.May is used to express permission. May not is used to deny permission.Notes.Possibility.May is also used to express possibility.May is also used in expressing a wish.May is used in subordinate clauses that express a purpose.Might.More items…•

Can I or could I?

For example, “Could I please have some water?” Could is the past tense of can. However, when asking for permission, could does not have a past tense meaning. Could has the same meaning as may when making requests. It is equally polite to say “Could I leave early?” or “May I leave early?”

Can I ask you for something meaning?

When you need to ask someone a question that’s important, complicated, or might make them upset, you first ask: Of course, this is already a question, so sometimes when you ask someone “Can I ask you a question?” they will respond: … You just did!

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

May I ask you a question? Asking for permission. In addition, “may” version is more polite than the “can” version. Realistically speaking, both ask for permission and neither is offensive, but yes, “may” is still more polite than “can.”

Can a teacher deny bathroom?

Yes, a teacher can say “no” to allowing a student to use the bathroom. Every teacher knows that some students will ask to use the restroom whether they really need to go or not. … The first rule is that no student is allowed to use the bathroom during direct instruction.