Can I Or May I Which Is Correct?

How do you use may I?

If you use “May I…” then you are asking permission to use the book and bring it back at a later time.

Therefore you would hopefully say that “May I…” is the correct choice here.

Your ability is assumed, so you really just want to ask permission..

Can vs Can grammar?

Can, like could and would, is used to ask a polite question, but can is only used to ask permission to do or say something (“Can I borrow your car?” “Can I get you something to drink?”). Could is the past tense of can, but it also has uses apart from that–and that is where the confusion lies.

Can I or could I?

For example, “Could I please have some water?” Could is the past tense of can. However, when asking for permission, could does not have a past tense meaning. Could has the same meaning as may when making requests. It is equally polite to say “Could I leave early?” or “May I leave early?”

Where do we use might and may?

‘may’ and ‘might’Level: beginner.We can use may not to refuse permission or to say that someone does not have permission, but it is formal and emphatic:We use might when we are not sure about something in the present or future:Level: intermediate.We use may have and might have to make guesses about the past:Level: beginner.More items…

Can you or could you which is correct?

“Could” is the polite form of “can”—so both are correct, but we use them in different situations. We use “can” when we are telling someone to do something. We use “could” when we are making a request. Teacher to students: “Can you please be quiet!”

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

May I ask you a question? Asking for permission. In addition, “may” version is more polite than the “can” version. Realistically speaking, both ask for permission and neither is offensive, but yes, “may” is still more polite than “can.”

Could sentences examples in English?

Could sentence examplesWhat could he do about it but lose more sleep? … I wish you could hear yourself talking. … How could she blame him? … I had let so much gas out of my balloon that I could not rise again, and in a few minutes the earth closed over my head. … How could he find out? … I never thought I could do it.More items…

Could may might possibility?

It’s not the same as ‘may not’ and ‘might not.’ So let’s summarise. When you want to talk about possibilities, use could, may and might. They all mean the same thing and we use them all to talk about things that are possibly true now and things that will possibly happen in the future.

Can I go to the bathroom vs May I?

But the permission use of can is not in fact incorrect in standard English. The only difference between the two verbs is that one is more polite than the other. In informal contexts it’s perfectly acceptable to use can; in formal situations it would be better to use may.

Which is correct I will or I would?

The main difference between will and would is that would can be used in the past tense but will cannot. Also, would is commonly used to refer to a future event that may occur under specific conditions, while will is used more generally to refer to future events.

Why is can I go to the bathroom wrong?

So while yes, asking “may I go to the bathroom?” is asking for permission, asking the “can” question is actually referring to “are the conditions of me being able to the bathroom met?” which includes but is not exclusive just having permission. …

Can May grammar?

May is the more formal word, and if you are at all concerned about being tut-tutted, a safe choice. Can is now the verb of choice for ability, and both can and may are still used in the “possibility” sense. You may use can if you wish, and you can use may if it makes you feel better.

Can could may might grammar?

Both “may” and “can” are used to indicate that something is allowed, but “may” is more formal: “You may leave whenever you like” is more formal than “You can go whenever you want to.” Children are often taught that only “may” is used for permission, and that “can” is used only for ability.

Where is could used?

Could: “Could” is used to express possibility. Something that could happen is not necessarily something that must happen. Could does not express desire or opinion. It is simply used to state one or more things that are possible (even if they are unlikely) or were possible in the past (even if they didn’t happen).

Can and May in a sentence?

Although, traditionally, can has meant “to be able” and may has meant “to be permitted” or to express possibility, both can and may are commonly used interchangeably in respect to permission. Example: He can hold his breath for 30 seconds. … Example: He may hold his breath for 30 seconds.